Newly Discovered Mycenaean Grave Reveals Nobleman’s Love of Jewelry

The Bronze Age grave uncovered by archaeologists is the size of a small house and had remained untouched by grave robbers, preserving its contents.


Archaeologists in southern Greece have discovered an undisturbed tomb the size of a small house that belonged to a Bronze Age nobleman with a fondness for jewelry

Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 3,350-year-old chamber near Orchomenos, an important center of the Mycenaean era, belonged to a man who was 40 to 50 years old when he died.

The ministry said in a statement Monday that the 42-square-meter (452-square-foot) grave was only used once. That’s a boon for archaeologists seeking to interpret its contents. Most such tombs were reused over many years, during which older objects were jumbled up or pilfered.

The nobleman’s tomb contained pottery vessels sheathed in tin, bronze horse bits, jewelry, bow fittings and arrowheads.

The ministry says jewelry is more typically associated with the burials of Mycenaean women. [AP]

This article was first published by ekathimerini.com on 11/09/17


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