Domaine Gerovassiliou, the Oenophile’s Choice

Winery and museum in one.


Vangelis Gerovassiliou became a vintner out of sheer obstinacy. His father, Argyris, was a farmer. He made wine, but only for family occasions. While still fresh the wine was pleasant enough, but it tended to sour with time. As a student at the Agricultural University of Athens, Vangelis sought ways to improve it. He asked a chemical engineer for help. “I can’t tell you. It’s a secret,” the scientist replied. His secretiveness angered Vangelis and in the mid-1970s he decided to find the answers himself and changed his major to oenology.

So, Vangelis found himself in Bordeaux, where he received his degree and had the good fortune to work with Emile Paynaud, guru of the oenological sciences. The French master recommended Vangelis for the post of oenologist at the legendary estate of Porto Carras in Halkidiki, where he went on to work for 22 years. It was a major educational experience, but he was not happy working for others and decided to start his own vineyard, building on a family-owned, 1.2-hectare plot in Epanomi, on the outskirts of Thessaloniki. He bought an additional 3.6 hectares and planted only white varieties, mainly Malagousia and Assyrtiko. His winery grew to lead the vanguard of a major shakeup in the Greek vineyard and wine scene, particularly by the showcasing of the Malagousia variety, largely overlooked at the time.

Today, the Gerovassiliou estate covers more than 56 hectares. Its brightest star is Malagousia, followed by Assyrtiko, Limnio, Mavrotragano, Mavroudi, Syrah, Merlot, Viognier and Grenache rouge. Annual production stands at 250,000 bottles of white and 50,000 of red, with exports at around 35 percent.

But the Thessalonian vintner is not just proud of his award-winning labels. The Gerovassiliou Wine Museum he has created in the state-of-the-art Epanomi winery exhibits old presses and bottles, as well as barrels, farming equipment and machinery from a bygone era. The most fascinating part of the exhibit is a collection of 2,600 openers and corkscrews, which is considered among the largest in the world.

 

Try

Domaine Gerovassiliou Malagousia

Made from the Malagousia variety that was nearly extinct before being revived thanks to the efforts of Vangelis Gerovassiliou, with strong fruity aromas (pear, mango and citrus) and a rich mouthfeel with intense lemon notes.

Pair with

Mediterranean classics including seafood, poultry, pasta with light sauces and fresh salads.

Visit: www.gerovassiliou.gr


Read More

Thessaloniki

The Art of Doing Nothing

A great way to get to know Thessaloniki is to...


Thessaloniki

Why the Thessaloniki Film Festival is Better Than Ever

The Thessaloniki International Film Festival, now in its 60th year,...


GASTRONOMY

A Dionysian Weekend in Halkidiki

Globe-trotting oenophiles will find 
everything they could wish for on...


GASTRONOMY

Santorini’s Iconic Varieties

Vinsanto is a dessert wine with international appeal, while Assyrtiko...


Greece Is Blog Posts

An Easter to Remember

BY Pavlos Zafiropoulos

“Can I have the lamb’s teeth?” Haris, a close family...

read more >

Social Distance on a Greek Island in the COVID-19 Pandemic

BY Lisa Radinovsky

This post was originally published on the blog...

read more >

Coronavirus Diary: Life in Athens in Times of (Another) Crisis, Day 31

BY Gigi Papoulias

Editor’s note: The following has been taken from...

read more >